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OLDER POSTS

Latest Works

Here are a few of my latest plexiglass, epoxy resin and pigment portraits, just a week ago they were on display at the Art.FairCologne. We had a great show, pictures of the fair will be posted next week.

johndoe-200-160-original-painting

jane-doe-200-160-painting

john-doe-182-145-painting

jane-doe-182-145-painting


Mr. Sandman, bring me a dream.

I’m currently sanding and finishing off two paintings that’ll soon be on their way to Cologne, Germany. I’ll keep you posted to see the finished results.

IMG_0278

IMG_0280

IMG_0283


Throwback Thursday: Religious C*nts D*cks & *ssh*l*s

This series represent large scale simplified human genitalia. Each ” c*nt, d*ck or *ssh*l*” represents a religious figure I don’t approve of, instead of painting the person themselves, because that would just be too easy.

The paintings are made to look like lead and stained glass windows, like often found in churches and mosques. This way, I want to try to create awareness, through aesthetically beautiful paintings, that religion keeps dividing our world.

Religious-cunt-3-light-reflection-01-e1455145392393


Throwback Thursday: Project warfume agent – Phosgene

Most people know me for my paintings on plexiglass. But every year I work on a special project, to explore new ideas and new materials.

From 2011-2012, I worked on a project called ‘Project Warfume Agent’. For this particular project, I explored the correlation between the long term destructive force of chemical warfare agents in times of war, and advertisement in our modern society.

The series shows eight one-off custom designed perfume bottles labelled with their corresponding logos of toxic gasses. Each bottle contains subtle hints with information regarding the warfare agent, and the packaging refers to its type, origin and use of the toxic gas.

All the pieces have been made using steel, glass, aluminum, gloss paint, varnish, stainless steel, spray nozzle, recycled gas bottle, sterling silver, Swarovski crystals, photopaper, vinyl, velvet, brass, polyamide, transparent resin, wood, hay, styrofoam and plexiglass

In this post, I’d like to tell you a bit more about one particular piece called ‘Phosgene’.

PHOSGENE

A bit of history

phosgene

Phosgene is the chemical compound with the formula COCl2. This colorless gas gained infamy as a chemical weapon during World War I where it was responsible for about 85% of the 100,000 deaths caused by chemical weapons. It is also a valued industrial reagent and building block insynthesis of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds. In low concentrations, its odor resembles freshly cut hay or grass.[5] In addition to its industrial production, small amounts occur from the breakdown and the combustion of organochlorine compounds, such as those used inrefrigeration systems.[6] The chemical was named by combining the Greek words ‘phos’ (meaning light) and genesis (birth); it does not mean it contains any phosphorus (cf. phosphine).

Call Me Frank’s interpretation – Phosgene

Phosgene call me frank Phosgene call me frank

boekske

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Throwback: Rumour, discussion, argument & fantasy

Say hello to Chastity and Candy. Yes, they are prostitutes. 

These ladies were part of a project I did in 2010-2011, when I painted 8 life-sized prostitutes on recycled windows using acrylic and gloss paint on plexiglass along with LED lights, aluminium, wood, curtains and rubber.

Why I chose the theme of prostitution? Find out more on the project page.

 

find out more about this project

NEW WORK. John Doe painting

The last couple of weeks, I’ve mainly been concentrating on the following paintings. The male John Doe portrait is being shipped to New York as we speak, for the Context art fair. The female Jane Doe XL isn’t quite finished yet, but I’m getting there. Hand mixing pigment and epoxy resins is very time consuming, but I still believe the result is quite stunning.

call me frank

call me frank

call me frank

more john and jane does

Upcoming: Art Breda – Context NY

A quick update on upcoming exhibitions, as my work will be shown at two art fairs in the coming weeks:

Art Breda 2016

Galerie Van Campen en Rochtus will be showing work in Breda from 10th until 17th April 2016. For more information about the fair, click here.

Context New York

The Cube Gallery will also be showing my work, in New York from 3rd until 8th May. Click here for more information.

 


NEW WORK. Portraits on plexiglass

The past month I have been extremely busy making new work.

I’m still working on a Jane Doe XL that should be finished in a couple of weeks. In the meantime, I also made a male and female portrait. These pieces will be shown at Galerie Van Campen en Rochtus in Knokke, at the Belgian coast. Hope you like them! 


Mad world.

Yesterday was a dark day in our history.

The terrorist attacks in Brussels were frightening, and we’ve never felt this war getting as close as it has yesterday. All my thoughts go out to everyone who suffered from these barbaric acts.

I keep reading this in the media: ‘It wasn’t a matter of if, if was a matter of when‘. How scary is that?

Almost immediately, the world wide web was filled with outpourings of emotion and displays of solidarity. One of the most remarkable things was how united all the Belgian people grew throughout the day: “Tous ensemble, Bruxelles ma Belle”. Basically, we were saying this: Dear terrorists. We are strong, we are united, we love each other, you can’t break us and we WILL get through this. I’m thankful we responded in such a resilient way, and I hope we can keep reacting as we did in the future.

I’m sorry if the painting that comes along with this post makes you feel uncomfortable. Making people feel comfortable was never my intention when painting it. The idea came from having seen a documentary made by VICE, about small children in Syria being prepared for their holy war. I felt so struck and emotional by it that it had me thinking: do we really want our kids growing up in this world? How do we explain all the bad things that are happening? How do we convince them that life is something beautiful and that the world is a wonderful place? I don’t have an exact answer to this, but I think the first step is: by believing it ourselves. By using the same resilience and strength we portrayed yesterday. By keeping ourselves united and showing eath other love and respect.

Belgium, be safe and keep strong.


Throwback Thursday: Project warfume agent – Agent Orange

Most people know me for my paintings on plexiglass. But every year I work on a special project, to explore new ideas and new materials.

From 2011-2012, I worked on a project called ‘Project Warfume Agent’. For this particular project, I explored the correlation between the long term destructive force of chemical warfare agents in times of war, and advertisement in our modern society.

The series shows eight one-off custom designed perfume bottles labelled with their corresponding logos of toxic gasses. Each bottle contains subtle hints with information regarding the warfare agent, and the packaging refers to its type, origin and use of the toxic gas.

All the pieces have been made using steel, glass, aluminum, gloss paint, varnish, stainless steel, spray nozzle, recycled gas bottle, sterling silver, Swarovski crystals, photopaper, vinyl, velvet, brass, polyamide, transparent resin, wood, hay, styrofoam and plexiglass

In this post, I’d like to tell you a bit more about one particular piece called ‘Agent Orange’.

AGENT ORANGE

A bit of history

Agent Orange

“Agent Orange—or Herbicide Orange (HO)—is one of the herbicides and defoliants used by the U.S. military as part of its herbicidal warfareprogram, Operation Ranch Hand, during the Vietnam War from 1961 to 1971.[2] It was a mixture of equal parts of two herbicides, 2,4,5-Tand 2,4-D.
During the late 1940s and 1950s, the US and Britain collaborated on development of herbicides with potential applications in warfare. Some of those products were brought to market as herbicides. The British were the first to employ herbicides and defoliants to destroy the crops, bushes, and trees of communist insurgents in Malaya during the Malayan Emergency. These operations laid the groundwork for the subsequent use of Agent Orange and other defoliant formulations by the US.”

Agent Orange was manufactured for the U.S. Department of Defense primarily by Monsanto Corporation and Dow Chemical. It was given its name from the color of the orange-striped barrels in which it was shipped, and was by far the most widely used of the so-called “Rainbow Herbicides”.

 

Call Me Frank’s interpretation – Agent Orange


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